An insider account of media's complicity with power

With riots and demonstrations on the streets, and protest camps popping up in cities around the world, political systems everywhere are in the spotlight.

For Western representative democracies, that means people waking up to the illusion of influence in occasional votes versus their lack of any real power. They are finding how money acts via corporations, financial markets and a minority elite to occupy the vacuum.

Fraudcast News, the confessions of an ex-Reuters reporter, dissects media's failure to highlight people's powerlessness. It shows how journalism, far from acting as a popular watchdog, suffers just the same problems of capture as governments themselves.

Yet this book is a work of optimism and promise. Its conclusions lay out how ordinary citizens can revolutionise their democracies by revolutionising journalism, building from the grassroots upwards.

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                      Fraudcast News
      Paperback, 238 pages, February 2012

          Paper Back £10    Ebook £2    Get the PDF


Author's note:

I've published the book independently, meaning I can give away free PDFs if I want to, which I do. It also means I need all the promotional help I can get from friends, family and anyone else who wishes for more accountable journalism and politics in their lives.

Any assistance is welcome. You could just forward this page link to your friends, or copy and paste its contents into an email. You could review and rate the book online here, "follow" me on Twitter (@PatrickChalmers), "like" the book on Facebook or subscribe and follow the Fraudcast News blog.

If you get really carried away, you could get me to do an author's reading, short film screening, book signing and Q+A session. If geography's a challenge, you might arrange for me to do a skype phone or video interview with your local newspaper, radio or television station. Maybe you have other ideas for stunts I could try - though I draw the line at invading sovereign nations just because they've got things I want.

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